medication to treat arthritis

Not Half Bad

Photo by Jen Goellnitz

At age 69, my running these days consists mostly of alternating short bursts of slow running with short walks. If I’m rested and have my feet to the fire, I can run six miles or so continuously, but I rarely try. Despite this, my endurance is still good.

Personal circumstances led me to . . . → Read More: Not Half Bad

Ultrarunning Hyperbole

Image via Wikipedia

Certain tainted words occur repeatedly in journalism about ultrarunning, all of which cause noisy alarms to go off in my head whenever I see them. The four most frequent culprits are:

crazy
grueling
test[ing] limits
extreme

Rarely have I ever read an article about ultrarunning by a non-ultrarunner that does not use the word crazy to describe the . . . → Read More: Ultrarunning Hyperbole

North Coast 24-Hour Endurance Run 2009

The North Coast 24-Hour Endurance Run (NC24) in Cleveland, Ohio made a spectacular debut in its first edition on October 3–4, 2009. As host to the USA Track and Field/American Ultrarunning Association national championship, it drew a total of 107 runners: 82 men and 24 women. That the venue provides a fast course . . . → Read More: North Coast 24-Hour Endurance Run 2009

Running Pemberton Trail

Saturday afternoon I ran Pemberton Trail. The high in Phoenix was 102, about normal for this time of year. I didn’t see another human soul out there the whole time, not even in the parking lot.

I felt good at the start, anxious to get in a good workout. I wore my light . . . → Read More: Running Pemberton Trail

Spinning Statistical Meaning

At Across the Years this year I earned a jacket for covering 1000 miles lifetime in my seventh year of running it. That’s the accumulated total from one 24-hour race, one 48-hour race, and five 72-hour races.

(Update: My total following the 2010 race is 1516.58 miles, the fourth most overall. That’s . . . → Read More: Spinning Statistical Meaning

Why Ultrarunning?

Image via Wikipedia

On the Ultra List ultrarunning e-mail list one subscriber surmised:

“…some people get into ultrarunning to prove to the world that they’re “tough.” Deep down inside they feel weak, so they compensate by doing something physically difficult.”

Another responded:

Or to prove it to themselves. Running ultras is hard, painful, expensive, dangerous and . . . → Read More: Why Ultrarunning?

Latest Blog Articles

Blog Categories

History